Linux User Group of Mauritius Promoting open source software in our beautiful island

26Oct/170

Countries where Mauritians do not need a visa

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

Here are the 94 countries where we, Mauritians, can go without having to have a visa:

Albania, Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Bulgaria, Chile, China, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czechia, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Haiti, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kosovo, Latvia, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macao, Macedonia (FYROM), Malawi, Malaysia, Malta, Micronesia, Monaco, Montenegro, Mozambique, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Palestinian Territories, Panama, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, San Marino, Senegal, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, United Kingdom, Vanuatu, Vatican City, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

These 27 countries issue a visa to Mauritians as soon as they arrive:

Bolivia, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Comoros, Congo (Dem. Rep.), Cote d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), Djibouti, Guinea-Bissau, Iran, Jordan, Laos, Madagascar, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Nepal, Nicaragua, Palau, Qatar, Samoa, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Turkey, Tuvalu, Ukraine and United Arab Emirates.

These 3 countries have special procedures concerning the visa they deliver:

India (Electronic Visa), Sri Lanka (Electronic Travel Authorization ) and Seychelles (Visitor’s permit)

And, finally, these are the countries which force us to obtain a visa before visiting them:

Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bhutan, Brazil, Brunei, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Cuba, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Honduras, Iraq, Ireland, Kazakhstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Mexico, Moldova, Mongolia, Morocco, Myanmar [Burma], Nauru, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Oman, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Suriname, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Tonga, Turkmenistan, United States of America, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam and Yemen.

[Raw data obtained from Passport Index]

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6Oct/170

How to reduce the amount of disk space used by the systemd journal

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

We, Linux people, generally use systemd now and one of its components is the journal controlled by the journalctl command line tool.

As explained on the Arch wiki,

systemd has its own logging system called the journal. The /var/log/journal/directory is a part of the systemd package and the journal will write to /var/log/journal/

The journal is always appended and therefore grows in size. On my laptop, the journal was taking 1.8Gb of space and was full of details which, I believe, I’ll never need. So I decided to clear all old contents (which the systemd people call a vacuum). I issued:

journalctl --disk-usage
journalctl --vacuum-size=64M
journalctl --disk-usage

And the journal immediately became smaller. I then issued a

journalctl --verify

which made ma realise that some of the remaining journal files were corrupted (for some reason). There is no journal repair tool in systemd so I simply removed the offending files (with rm).

Now, I can easily check my journal entries for today and I know everything will be all fine:

journalctl --since today

6Oct/170

How to reduce the amount of disk space used by the systemd journal

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

We, Linux people, generally use systemd now and one of its components is the journal controlled by the journalctl command line tool.

As explained on the Arch wiki,

systemd has its own logging system called the journal. The /var/log/journal/directory is a part of the systemd package and the journal will write to /var/log/journal/

The journal is always appended and therefore grows in size. On my laptop, the journal was taking 1.8Gb of space and was full of details which, I believe, I’ll never need. So I decided to clear all old contents (which the systemd people call a vacuum). I issued:

journalctl --disk-usage
journalctl --vacuum-size=64M
journalctl --disk-usage

And the journal immediately became smaller. I then issued a

journalctl --verify

which made me realise that some of the remaining journal files were corrupted (for some reason). There is no journal repair tool in systemd so I simply removed the offending files (with rm).

Now, I can easily check my journal entries for today and I know everything will be all fine:

journalctl --since today

4Oct/170

The relative wealth of Mauritians

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

Last week, during the eLearning Africa conference, a lot of foreign delegates were amazed on how advanced Mauritius is. They marveled at our roads, our hotels, our cars, our clothes, etc.

A few days ago, I stumbled upon a very interesting website, Global Rich List, which essentially allows you to enter your annual income (which is, for most of us, 13 x your monthly salary) and gives you an indication of which percentile of the richest people in the world you are. Some examples are much better than this convoluted explanation:

With Rs 5,000 per month i.e. Rs 65,000 per year

You’re in the top 29.15% richest people in the world by income.
That makes you the 1,749,243,103rd richest person on earth by income.

With Rs 10,000 per month i.e. Rs 130,000 per year

You’re in the top 19.79% richest people in the world by income.
That makes you the 1,187,104,291st richest person on earth by income.

With Rs 20,000 per month i.e. Rs 260,000 per year

You’re in the top 10.10% richest people in the world by income.
That makes you the 606,237,728th richest person on earth by income.

With Rs 50,000 per month i.e. Rs 650,000 per year

You’re in the top 0.86% richest people in the world by income.
That makes you the 51,631,144th richest person on earth by income.

With Rs 100,000 per month i.e. Rs 1,300,000 per year

You’re in the top 0.13% richest people in the world by income.
That makes you the 8,011,084th richest person on earth by income.

and, finally,

With Rs 3,100,000,000 per month i.e. (approx) Rs 40,000,000,000 per year

You’re in the top 0.0001% richest people in the world by income.
That makes you the 1st richest person on earth by income.

The last one is just for fun of course 🙂

Based on those numbers, we can safely say that we are very lucky to live in Mauritius: it is a beautiful country and, believe it or not, we are rich.

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