Linux User Group of Mauritius Promoting open source software in our beautiful island

30Nov/170

Informative and Restrained as opposed to Superficial and Flashy

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

Infotech 2017 has started.

And I am happy to notice that, except for one or two stands, things are much more “Informative and Restrained” compared to previous editions where things tended to be “Superficial and Flashy”.

Allow me to explain.

In Mauritius, for the past few years, we have become a nation of seminars, workshops, conferences and exhibitions and, unfortunately, many of them are quite superficial and very very flashy indeed. For the past six months, I have been to many such events where the venue was beautiful (a nice hotel with a beautiful view of the lagoon), the food was excellent, the hostesses out of this world but where, personally, I felt that there was not much to listen to and learn from, except from a minority of the speakers. This is what I call “Superficial and Flashy”.

What I would prefer to have, from a personal point of view, is the kind of chaotic geekish meetup as pictured above. An event where intelligent people of all horizons can meet, exchange views, share ideas and move forward together. Of course, there is a need for a venue and some food but nothing ostentatious. This is what I call “Informative and Restrained”.

The thing is that it is easier to do “Superficial and Flashy” than “Informative and Restrained”. The reason for that is that to be informative, the speakers need to be of high-caliber and need to be properly prepared.

This is your typical Googler. Similar people are changing our worlds everyday at Google, Facebook, Amazon, Apple, etc. but also in the IT division of most of the companies in the world. And, before you laugh, let me remind you that they run the world.

Pictured above are some of the people who have basically built the world as it is known today. Without them, we would still be waiting for The A-Team to be shown on TV on Saturday night. They are Steve Jobs (Apple), Sergey Brin (Google), Bill Gates (Microsoft), Larry Page (Google), Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook) and Jeff Bezos (Amazon). The missing ones being Linus Torvalds (Linux) and Richard Stallman (Free Software Foundation).

Of course, we won’t have Steve (RIP), Sergey, Bill, Larry, Mark, Jeff, Linus or Richard at Infotech. Maybe next year…

But we’ll have the 2nd best thing: the (real) innovators of Mauritius, each on his/her respective “Informative and Restrained” stand and willing to share his/her passion with you.

You just have to put aside your tendency to value the “Superficial and Flashy”, walk toward them and talk to them.

Enjoy 🙂

(First photo, courtesy of Le Méridien. Second photo, courtesy of Concept7. Third photo, courtesy of Business Insider. Fourth photo, courtesy of Youth Connect. Fifth photo, courtesy of PC Risk).

30Nov/170

Informative and Restrained as opposed to Superficial and Flashy

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

Infotech 2017 has started.

And I am happy to notice that, except for one or two stands, things are much more “Informative and Restrained” compared to previous editions where things tended to be “Superficial and Flashy”.

Allow me to explain.

In Mauritius, for the past few years, we have become a nation of seminars, workshops, conferences and exhibitions and, unfortunately, many of them are quite superficial and very very flashy indeed. For the past six months, I have been to many such events where the venue was beautiful (a nice hotel with a beautiful view of the lagoon), the food was excellent, the hostesses out of this world but where, personally, I felt that there was not much to listen to and learn from, except from a minority of the speakers. This is what I call “Superficial and Flashy”.

What I would prefer to have, from a personal point of view, is the kind of chaotic geekish meetup as pictured above. An event where intelligent people of all horizons can meet, exchange views, share ideas and move forward together. Of course, there is a need for a venue and some food but nothing ostentatious. This is what I call “Informative and Restrained”.

The thing is that it is easier to do “Superficial and Flashy” than “Informative and Restrained”. The reason for that is that to be informative, the speakers need to be of high-caliber and need to be properly prepared.

This is your typical Googler. Similar people are changing our worlds everyday at Google, Facebook, Amazon, Apple, etc. but also in the IT division of most of the companies in the world. And, before you laugh, let me remind you that they run the world.

Pictured above are some of the people who have basically built the world as it is known today. Without them, we would still be waiting for The A-Team to be shown on TV on Saturday night. They are Steve Jobs (Apple), Sergey Brin (Google), Bill Gates (Microsoft), Larry Page (Google), Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook) and Jeff Bezos (Amazon). The missing ones being Linus Torvalds (Linux) and Richard Stallman (Free Software Foundation).

Of course, we won’t have Steve (RIP), Sergey, Bill, Larry, Mark, Jeff, Linus or Richard at Infotech. Maybe next year…

But we’ll have the 2nd best thing: the (real) innovators of Mauritius, each on his/her respective “Informative and Restrained” stand and willing to share his/her passion with you.

You just have to put aside your tendency to value the “Superficial and Flashy”, walk toward them and talk to them.

Enjoy 🙂

(First photo, courtesy of Le Méridien. Second photo, courtesy of Concept7. Third photo, courtesy of Business Insider. Fourth photo, courtesy of Youth Connect. Fifth photo, courtesy of PC Risk).

6Oct/170

How to reduce the amount of disk space used by the systemd journal

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

We, Linux people, generally use systemd now and one of its components is the journal controlled by the journalctl command line tool.

As explained on the Arch wiki,

systemd has its own logging system called the journal. The /var/log/journal/directory is a part of the systemd package and the journal will write to /var/log/journal/

The journal is always appended and therefore grows in size. On my laptop, the journal was taking 1.8Gb of space and was full of details which, I believe, I’ll never need. So I decided to clear all old contents (which the systemd people call a vacuum). I issued:

journalctl --disk-usage
journalctl --vacuum-size=64M
journalctl --disk-usage

And the journal immediately became smaller. I then issued a

journalctl --verify

which made ma realise that some of the remaining journal files were corrupted (for some reason). There is no journal repair tool in systemd so I simply removed the offending files (with rm).

Now, I can easily check my journal entries for today and I know everything will be all fine:

journalctl --since today

6Oct/170

How to reduce the amount of disk space used by the systemd journal

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

We, Linux people, generally use systemd now and one of its components is the journal controlled by the journalctl command line tool.

As explained on the Arch wiki,

systemd has its own logging system called the journal. The /var/log/journal/directory is a part of the systemd package and the journal will write to /var/log/journal/

The journal is always appended and therefore grows in size. On my laptop, the journal was taking 1.8Gb of space and was full of details which, I believe, I’ll never need. So I decided to clear all old contents (which the systemd people call a vacuum). I issued:

journalctl --disk-usage
journalctl --vacuum-size=64M
journalctl --disk-usage

And the journal immediately became smaller. I then issued a

journalctl --verify

which made me realise that some of the remaining journal files were corrupted (for some reason). There is no journal repair tool in systemd so I simply removed the offending files (with rm).

Now, I can easily check my journal entries for today and I know everything will be all fine:

journalctl --since today

15Mar/170

Open and not extract .docx, .xlsx and .pptx files in the latest Gnome 3

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

In the latest version of Gnome 3, a subtle change was brought to Nautilus, the file manager, to automatically extract the content of a ZIP file in a new folder when it is double-clicked on instead of open an application to do so. The problem is that Microsoft Office files (.docx, .xlsx, .pptx, etc.) are ZIP files. This means that double-clicking on a .pptx file extracts its content instead of opening the file in, say, LibreOffice Impress!

This makes life miserable for all those who need to open Microsoft Office files on a regular basis and, of course, this is a bug (as acknowledged by the Gnome people  and the Red Hat / Fedora people).

Fortunately, it is quite easy to make Nautilus become sane again. Open Preferences and in the Behavior tab, unselect “Extract the files on open” in the Compressed Files section.

Phew!

15Mar/170

Open and not extract .docx, .xlsx and .pptx files in the latest Gnome 3

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

In the latest version of Gnome 3, a subtle change was brought to Nautilus, the file manager, to automatically extract the content of a ZIP file in a new folder when it is double-clicked on instead of open an application to do so. The problem is that Microsoft Office files (.docx, .xlsx, .pptx, etc.) are ZIP files. This means that double-clicking on a .pptx file extracts its content instead of opening the file in, say, LibreOffice Impress!

This makes life miserable for all those who need to open Microsoft Office files on a regular basis and, of course, this is a bug (as acknowledged by the Gnome people  and the Red Hat / Fedora people).

Fortunately, it is quite easy to make Nautilus become sane again. Open Preferences and in the Behavior tab, unselect “Extract the files on open” in the Compressed Files section.

Phew!

15Jun/160

Automatically raise windows in Gnome

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

20160615-automatically-raise-windows

I love Gnome 3… except when I am using a terminal, decide to launch Chrome by clicking on its icon in the Dash and not realising that the terminal still have focus despite Chrome being shown on screen. Consequently, typing, say, www.noulakaz.net and pressing enter only sends these keystrokes to the terminal (despite Chrome being shown) with potentially serious consequences.

But lo and behold, I have just found a solution. Just launch the Gnome Tweak Tool as shown above and put “Automatically Raise Windows” to ON.

I have regained my sanity!

15Jun/160

Automatically raise windows in Gnome

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

20160615-automatically-raise-windows

I love Gnome 3… except when I am using a terminal, decide to launch Chrome by clicking on its icon in the Dash and not realising that the terminal still have focus despite Chrome being shown on screen. Consequently, typing, say, www.noulakaz.net and pressing enter only sends these keystrokes to the terminal (despite Chrome being shown) with potentially serious consequences.

But lo and behold, I have just found a solution. Just launch the Gnome Tweak Tool as shown above and put “Automatically Raise Windows” to ON.

I have regained my sanity!

1Jun/160

Vagrant box export and import

Posted by Ish

I’ve been a VirtualBox user for a few years but I started working with Vagrant only recently. Vagrant provides an easy-to-use portable environment on top of virtual machine providers like VirtualBox, VMware, AWS etc; at least that is what is written everywhere.

While the internet abounds with articles and «expert» answers about how to work with Vagrant, I stumble upon a lot of blurry advice in needy times. The last resort, though not very tempting, is the official documentation. I say not very tempting because of the amount of reading required for just one set of command options.

Vagrant box export and import

Hashicorp, the company that funds the full-time development of Vagrant, hosts a catalog of Vagrant boxes for the different virtual machine providers, which is called Atlas. Let’s look at the command that is used to add a box to Vagrant.

vagrant box add opensuse/openSUSE-42.1-x86_64

In the above command opensuse is a user of Atlas and openSUSE-42.1-x86_64 is the name of the box. You might need the --provider option if you’re not using VirtualBox. Once the box has been added, it can be initialized as follows:

vagrant init opensuse/opensuse-42.1-x86_64

The command creates a Vagrantfile in the current directory with a lot of commented lines which you can uncomment to specify needed options with your Vagrant box (e.g shared folders, set memory etc). The following line in the file tells vagrant which base to use when provisioning the virtual machine the first time:

config.vm.box = "opensuse/opensuse-42.1-x86_64"

To start up the Vagrant box we’ll do vagrant up and a bunch of messages depending on the Vagrantfile parameters will show up (e.g SSH port forwarding). Next we do vagrant ssh to jump inside the Vagrant box. The first time the Vagrant box is started, a virtual machine is provisioned in VirtualBox (since that is what I am using as provider). At next boot the VM will jump to normal startup unless «provisioning» options are specified.

As Vagrant users enjoy easy portability of the boxes, the same can be exported following this quick procedure:

vagrant package --output opensuse-devel.box

Say you have set up a development environment on the openSUSE box and you need to share the same with other developers. The above command packages the virtual machine in one file, in our case it’s called opensuse-devel.box. Next each developer needs to add the box as follows:

vagrant box add openSUSE-devel opensuse-devel.box

I am naming the project openSUSE-devel for easy reference.

Sure, if not executed from the directory containing opensuse-devel.box then the full path to the file should be used. It makes the box available to Vagrant and a machine can then be initialized.

vagrant init openSUSE-devel; vagrant up

This creates the Vagrantfile and fires up the box. When one needs to destroy the box, just execute vagrant destroy and the virtual machine will be gone.

The post Vagrant box export and import appeared first on HACKLOG.

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23May/160

Developers Conference 2016, day 3 with openSUSE bug hunting

Posted by Ish

I had my «openSUSE bug hunting» presentation scheduled at 09h30 this morning. I’m usually very lazy on Sundays but the enthusiasm of the Developers Conference is just an amazing feeling. Though we live on a small island, we get to meet some people maybe just once a year during this fun event. I picked up Shelly on the way and we reached Voilà Hotel at 09h05. Right at the hotel entrance Yash was waiting, he might have seen us coming. We went upstairs chatting and met JoKi. My presentation was scheduled at the Accelerator and I thought I’d just go and test the gear. Aargh! The TV had only HDMI cable and my ThinkPad had VGA & a Mini DisplayPort. That said, I needed an adapter. Joffrey who came around greeting everyone had a HDMI to VGA cable, which he lent me. At that same time JoKi also came with a Mini DisplayPort to HDMI convertor. Great! Then I had an adapter plus a backup.

I mirrored my laptop display and checked if everything’s fine. All good and it was 09h30.

Developers Conference 2016, openSUSE bug hunting

Thank you for the photo, Shelly :)

However, folks were still coming, so we thought let’s just wait till 09h45 giving a chance for others to arrive. Indeed I started at 09h45 sharp with a 3/4 full room and just a few minutes later it was «house full». That was great and a true encouragement though a Sunday morning.







Thank you for the (re-)tweets folks. :D

I chose the title of my prez «openSUSE bug hunting» from a blog post I wrote in 2013 while running «release candidates» of openSUSE. Starting the presentation I spoke about how some folks might organize special events working to hunt and find bugs, while some bugs we just encounter when doing regular tasks. What do we do when we find one of those bugs? Do we just ignore and think, «it’s just an error, nothing more», and we continue work? Do we search on the internet whether others encountered similar errors and if there is a fix? Few people ever consider filing a bug report through the right channel, unless it’s just a «button» away like some applications (e.g web browsers) offer.

Bug reporting most of the time require some information gathering from the system; that is where I took the presentation. Before diving further into the system though, I opened a few bug reports from openSUSE Bugzilla to show as example. I also gave a quick overview of the openSUSE Build Service and openSUSE Connect. That helped show the audience how to find package maintainers and get information about official and non-official packages.

I did not have slides; but I rather fired-up an openSUSE Vagrant box inside which I had setup an environment for demos. The rest of the «talking» happened within the Vagrant box. We looked at how to obtain system information using command-line utilities and from the /proc fs. Next we looked at digging for application error info in log files. We played with systemctl and journalctl which gave us clear and concise information about application states. We then queried using rpm and its various options to get as much information about packages that we can use when filing the bug report. At that time an openSUSE user from the audience said we can also use zypper to search for installed packages on the system. Yes, indeed, but rpm -qa | grep php shows no clutter compared to zypper se php. I however grabbed the opportunity to tell the audience that folks having a «debian lifestyle» can still type aptitude equivalents to search and install packages from the command-line; thanks to the «zypper-aptitude» compatibility scripts written by Bernhard M. Wiedemann.

All while we continued digging for application errors and how to search and sort things from the logs; I did a quick demo using Nginx and PHP-FPM.


We talked about the need of default configuration files after installing PHP 7 and that such changes need to be addressed with the «openSUSE factory» guys.

It was near 10h30 and Jeshan signaled me that the next speaker had already come. I asked for a last 5 mins to show something quick using the «strace» tool. Actually a university student asked me a question before the event and I invited him to come to the prez and ask the question again so we could altogether see how tracing tools can help us find useful information for bug reports. That part of the prez might be good for a separate blog post. I sincerely have to apologize to the next speaker if he is reading this post; we started 15 mins late and that surely must have impacted other presentations.

Eddy and I talked about work stuffs after the presentation. Then some of us went to Bagatelle food-court for a mini-break. When we came back Sun was preparing his gear for the next presentation. He talked about grid systems, explained what are decks & cards and how it’s used on lexpress.mu. He showed some hidden features of lexpress.mu, like what happens when you type «heart» or «superlsl» while you’re on the homepage and how the text is read if you type «kozer» while you’re on an article page.


Sun demoed the «live article» feature of lexpress.mu and the work needed behind to keep it light, simple and fast. He talked about «facebook instant articles» and definitely we’re proud to be the first media group, not just in Mauritius, but in the African continent to deploy the same.


After Sun’s presentation I met my ex-colleagues and we went for a pizza & beer lunch at Flying Dodo.


The pizza being late and as the Developers Conference closing ceremony had started Shelly, Ubeid and I rushed back.

JoKi’s wife, Mary Jane, Vincent, Louis, Arnaud and a few others, we had figured how to hijack JoKi’s speech and bring on some more party time to celebrate JoKi’s birthday. Yeah, he’s getting old, now it’s confirmed as he turns 40. Ubeid quickly edited some slides and we told JoKi that as he finished his speech thanking everyone, we had a quick stuff to show; some sort of observation we’ve made. Ahaan! That’s when Arnaud, helped by Mary Jane’s cousin, they brought that big cake along with its table.

Everybody cheered! Everybody laughed. We all had fun, we had cake, we took crazy photos and celebrated the end of Developers Conference 2016.

Developers Conference 2016

Developers Conference 2016

Developers Conference 2016

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