Linux User Group of Mauritius Promoting open source software in our beautiful island

12Nov/140

Using jigdo to rebuild a Linux ISO image

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

20141111-little-by-little

A few years ago, Internet was very slow in Mauritius (and some will argue that this is still the case…) Downloading a Linux DVD (or, more precisely, an ISO image) took ages.

Now the Internet is way quicker but downloading a 4Gb ISO image still takes a long time.

A few years ago, a Debian guy invented Jigdo, a tool which I’ve been using for some time now to only download the few files I don’t have when a new Linux release is made and reconstruct the ISO locally. The steps to follow are documented in this post but are basically:

(1) Download the full ISO on a server where Internet is very quick (I do that on a VPS I have in the middle of the Silicon Valley where I routinely get 250Mbit/s). Let’s call the ISO image Centos-Linux-6.6.iso

(2) Use jigdo to create a .jigdo and a .template set of files. Before that it is important to mount the ISO on the distant server so that the individual files in the ISO can be accessed directly by jigdo. I generally do:

mkdir Centos-Linux-6.6

mount -t iso9660 -o loop Centos-Linux-6.6.iso Centos-Linux-6.6

jigdo-file mt -i Centos-Linux-6.6.iso -j Centos-Linux-6.6.jigdo -t Centos-Linux-6.6.template Centos-Linux-6.6/

(3) On completion, Centos-Linux-6.6.jigdo and Centos-Linux-6.6.template (which are generally small) need to be downloaded locally.

(4) The final step is to reconstruct the ISO locally. This is done by:

jigdo-lite Centos-Linux-6.6.jigdo

jigdo-lite will prompt for folder names with existing content. For example, when I used jigdo yesterday to reconstruct the latest Centos 6.6 ISO image, I already had a Centos 6.4 DVD and all the updates released since. I only had to point jigdo-lite to these existing folders and, voilà, in a few minutes I had the latest Centos 6.6 ISO image ready.

To be complete, jigdo-lite complained that one file was missing (python-paste-script-1.7.3-5.el6_3.noarch.rpm) which I had to download manually. It was just a small file so no big deal.

All in all, jigdo, even if the software is now in maintenance mode, is still a lifesaver for me. I hope it becomes one for you too.

Have fun ;-)

12Nov/140

Using jigdo to rebuild a Linux ISO image

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

20141111-little-by-little

A few years ago, Internet was very slow in Mauritius (and some will argue that this is still the case…) Downloading a Linux DVD (or, more precisely, an ISO image) took ages.

Now the Internet is way quicker but downloading a 4Gb ISO image still takes a long time.

A few years ago, a Debian guy invented Jigdo, a tool which I’ve been using for some time now to only download the few files I don’t have when a new Linux release is made and reconstruct the ISO locally. The steps to follow are documented in this post but are basically:

(1) Download the full ISO on a server where Internet is very quick (I do that on a VPS I have in the middle of the Silicon Valley where I routinely get 250Mbit/s). Let’s call the ISO image Centos-Linux-6.6.iso

(2) Use jigdo to create a .jigdo and a .template set of files. Before that it is important to mount the ISO on the distant server so that the individual files in the ISO can be accessed directly by jigdo. I generally do:

mkdir Centos-Linux-6.6

mount -t iso9660 -o loop Centos-Linux-6.6.iso Centos-Linux-6.6

jigdo-file mt -i Centos-Linux-6.6.iso -j Centos-Linux-6.6.jigdo -t Centos-Linux-6.6.template Centos-Linux-6.6/

(3) On completion, Centos-Linux-6.6.jigdo and Centos-Linux-6.6.template (which are generally small) need to be downloaded locally.

(4) The final step is to reconstruct the ISO locally. This is done by:

jigdo-lite Centos-Linux-6.6.jigdo

jigdo-lite will prompt for folder names with existing content. For example, when I used jigdo yesterday to reconstruct the latest Centos 6.6 ISO image, I already had a Centos 6.4 DVD and all the updates released since. I only had to point jigdo-lite to these existing folders and, voilà, in a few minutes I had the latest Centos 6.6 ISO image ready.

To be complete, jigdo-lite complained that one file was missing (python-paste-script-1.7.3-5.el6_3.noarch.rpm) which I had to download manually. It was just a small file so no big deal.

All in all, jigdo, even if the software is now in maintenance mode, is still a lifesaver for me. I hope it becomes one for you too.

Have fun ;-)

19Mar/140

Fixing Bittorrent clients crashing on Ubuntu

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

20140319-bittorrent

There are many Bittorrent client in Linux and, under Ubuntu (and this is surely true for other Linux distributions too), most of them depend on a library called libtorrent.

Under Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, libtorrent is buggy and causes Bittorrent clients to crash on a regular basis. The solution is, of course, to upgrade libtorrent from 0.15 to its latest version 0.16. The way to do that is to add the ppa:surfernsk/internet-software PPA and upgrade the whole system:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:surfernsk/internet-software

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get upgrade

Doing that upgrades python-libtorrent to 0.16 and installs libtorrent-rasterbar7. Removing libtorrent-rasterbar6 (which is not needed anymore) is simply a

sudo aptitude remove libtorrent-rasterbar6

Since doing that, Deluge, the Bittorrent client I use, hasn’t crashed at all. Life is cool.

(Solution obtained in the Deluge forum)

19Mar/140

Fixing Bittorrent clients crashing on Ubuntu

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

20140319-bittorrent

There are many Bittorrent client in Linux and, under Ubuntu (and this is surely true for other Linux distributions too), most of them depend on a library called libtorrent.

Under Ubuntu 12.04 LTS, libtorrent is buggy and causes Bittorrent clients to crash on a regular basis. The solution is, of course, to upgrade libtorrent from 0.15 to its latest version 0.16. The way to do that is to add the ppa:surfernsk/internet-software PPA and upgrade the whole system:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:surfernsk/internet-software

sudo apt-get update

sudo apt-get upgrade

Doing that upgrades python-libtorrent to 0.16 and installs libtorrent-rasterbar7. Removing libtorrent-rasterbar6 (which is not needed anymore) is simply a

sudo aptitude remove libtorrent-rasterbar6

Since doing that, Deluge, the Bittorrent client I use, hasn’t crashed at all. Life is cool.

(Solution obtained in the Deluge forum)

2Jun/130

Linux is more popular than Windows. Finally.

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

20130602-linux-more-popular

When I started using Linux in 2000, it was just 9 years old and practically no one knew about this strange operating system. Linus Torvalds, its creator, had as ambition to make Linux achieve world domination status. Of course, no one believed him.

Fast forward 13 years (i.e. 22 years after Linux’s birth) and something beautiful happens: Linux is now the most used operating system in the whole world thanks to Android which powers most smartphones and tablets and which is built on Linux. According to a Goldman Sachs’ private report, Android accounts for 41% of all computers on the planet, Apple MacOS X and iOS represent 23% and Windows only 20% (from its 95% of market share in 2004).

When Ubuntu Linux was created in August 2004, Mark Shuttleworth created bug report #1: “Liberation: Microsoft has a majority market share”. He has just closed the bug because, well, the bug is not a bug anymore as Microsoft software represents a minority now…

20130602-android-ios-vs-windows

Interestingly, this makes sense. Until the beginning of the ’90s, the world of computing was very interesting: there were a lot of competing companies like Microsoft, Atari, Commodore, Apple, etc. and this fostered a lot of innovation and major advances were made. When Microsoft Windows became popular at the end of the ’90s, Microsoft crushed all their opponents by abusing their position of dominance and resorting to anti-competitive practices.

In 2007, something special happened: Apple released the iPhone. In the same year, Google announced Android, an operating system for smartphones and tablets, based on Linux, and released for free in 2008. Since then, major companies like Samsung, LG, HTC and Sony have adopted Android.

This means that we’re now mostly in the same situation as before Microsoft crushed its competitors. We now have three platforms, Android, Apple and Microsoft, and this can only mean that more innovation is to come. At the end, we, users, are the ones who are going to benefit more from this.

Laws couldn’t get Microsoft to behave. Linux, indirectly, has.

2Jun/130

Linux is more popular than Windows. Finally.

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

20130602-linux-more-popular

When I started using Linux in 2000, it was just 9 years old and practically no one knew about this strange operating system. Linus Torvalds, its creator, had as ambition to make Linux achieve world domination status. Of course, no one believed him.

Fast forward 13 years (i.e. 22 years after Linux’s birth) and something beautiful happens: Linux is now the most used operating system in the whole world thanks to Android which powers most smartphones and tablets and which is built on Linux. According to a Goldman Sachs’ private report, Android accounts for 41% of all computers on the planet, Apple MacOS X and iOS represent 23% and Windows only 20% (from its 95% of market share in 2004).

When Ubuntu Linux was created in August 2004, Mark Shuttleworth created bug report #1: “Liberation: Microsoft has a majority market share”. He has just closed the bug because, well, the bug is not a bug anymore as Microsoft software represents a minority now…

20130602-android-ios-vs-windows

Interestingly, this makes sense. Until the beginning of the ’90s, the world of computing was very interesting: there were a lot of competing companies like Microsoft, Atari, Commodore, Apple, etc. and this fostered a lot of innovation and major advances were made. When Microsoft Windows became popular at the end of the ’90s, Microsoft crushed all their opponents by abusing their position of dominance and resorting to anti-competitive practices.

In 2007, something special happened: Apple released the iPhone. In the same year, Google announced Android, an operating system for smartphones and tablets, based on Linux, and released for free in 2008. Since then, major companies like Samsung, LG, HTC and Sony have adopted Android.

This means that we’re now mostly in the same situation as before Microsoft crushed its competitors. We now have three platforms, Android, Apple and Microsoft, and this can only mean that more innovation is to come. At the end, we, users, are the ones who are going to benefit more from this.

Laws couldn’t get Microsoft to behave. Linux, indirectly, has.

21Jan/110

La photo numérique sous Linux

Posted by Avinash Meetoo

Il n’est plus nécessaire de présenter Linux. Les serveurs de Google, de Facebook et d’Amazon (par exemple) fonctionnent sous Linux et offrent une qualité de service inégalée. Linux est aussi utilisé par les smartphones Android. Par contre, Linux est rarement visible dans les foyers ce qui est dommage parce que Linux permet d’utiliser des dizaines de milliers de logiciels libres  (opensource) souvent de très grande qualité.

Dans cet article, je présente quelques logiciels libres fonctionnant sous Linux pouvant être utilisés par des photographes amateurs ou confirmés pour organiser, modifier et partager leurs photos.

gphoto est un logiciel libre qui permet à Linux d’importer des photos de presque 1300 appareils photos numériques de marques et de modèles différents (de l’Apple iPhone jusqu’au Vivitar Vivicam en passant par tous les Canon, les Nikon, les Olympus et les Pentax de ce monde). gphoto peut être utilisé de façon autonome (les photos sont simplement sauvegardées dans un répertoire approprié) ou au sein d’un logiciel offrant des fonctionnalités plus avancées de gestion de photos.

Parmi ce genre de logiciels plus avancés, citons digiKam et Shotwell, ce dernier étant depuis peu le gestionnaire de photos standard d’Ubuntu (la distribution Linux la plus populaire au monde). Shotwell permet également d’organiser les photos par évènements (par date) et par mots clés (tagging). On peut mettre une note à ses photos (de zéro à cinq étoiles), de les renommer et de changer leurs dates.

Avec Shotwell, il devient facile de changer l’orientation des photos, de les recadrer, de réduire les yeux rouges et d’ajuster l’exposition, la saturation, la teinte et la température de chaque photo (manuellement ou automatiquement, en général avec de très bons résultats). Dès lors, plus de prétextes pour se contenter de photos moches…

Les possibilités de correction et de restauration de photos de Shotwell sont très souvent suffisantes mais, de temps en temps, il est nécessaire d’aller plus loin dans la manipulation d’image. Shotwell s’intègre parfaitement avec Gimp, un éditeur d’image très puissant avec une interface utilisateur nécessitant quelques heures d’adaptation pour en comprendre toute la finesse.

Les photographes avertis ont tendance à utiliser le format RAW à la place de JPEG (voir encadré plus bas) pour avoir plus de maîtrise sur le rendu final des photos. Par exemple, dans le milieu professionnel, il est impératif d’avoir un contrôle absolu sur la balance des blancs, des espaces RGB, des profiles ICC et du rendu des couleurs. Sur ces points, Shotwell ne faiblit pas. Grâce à l’intégration de libraw,  Shotwell peut facilement importer des photos RAW.

Dès que les fichiers RAW sont importés, Shotwell s’interface avec UFRaw qui offre un « workflow » de gestion des couleurs de niveau professionnel. UFRaw permet de modifier la balance des blancs (automatiquement ou manuellement), le rendu monochrome (en utilisant éventuellement un mélangeur RGB), la courbe de luminosité (avec possibilité d’utiliser une courbe personnalisée NTC), la gestion des couleurs (avec choix des profils ICC pour l’appareil photo, le fichier de sortie et l’écran), la correction de la luminosité et de la saturation des couleurs, le recadrage, la rotation, la modification des paramètres EXIF et, naturellement, la sauvegarde en formats JPEG, TIFF, PPM ou PNG avec choix du taux de compression. Comme vous pouvez le constater, que du très costaud…

Que-ce que le format RAW ?

Le RAW (qui signifie, bien sûr, brut en anglais) est un format de fichier produit par les appareils photos professionnels (et quelques appareils photos amateurs avec une mise à jour appropriée – voir ceci pour les Canon par exemple). Un fichier RAW contient, en général, les données enregistrées par le capteur numérique d’un appareil photo lors de la prise de vue. Ainsi, elle ne contient pas vraiment une image mais, plus précisément, des mesures électriques. Chaque appareil photo professionnel a son propre format RAW (parce que les capteurs ne sont pas les mêmes lorsqu’on change d’appareil..). Le RAW permet ensuite au photographe d’intervenir avec créativité sur la qualité finale des photos (à la manières des photographes d’antan qui intervenaient durant le processus de développement). Pour afficher un fichier RAW à l’écran, il est nécessaire d’utiliser un logiciel approprié.

Ce logiciel peut être dans l’appareil photo lui-même. Dans ce cas, l’appareil photo produit directement une image, le plus souvent dans le format JPEG. C’est ainsi pour la plupart des appareils photos amateurs. Cette solution est la plus contraignante parce que les possibilités de changer le rendu des photos par la suite sont limitées.

Dans le deuxième cas, le  logiciel est fourni à l’achat de l’appareil photo (e.g. ZoomBrowser pour Canon et ViewNX pour Nikon) et permet de manipuler les images après la prise de vue. En général, ces logiciels sont commerciaux et sont relativement austères. De nombreux photographes investissent dans d’autres logiciels onéreux tels que ceux d’Adobe.

La troisième possibilité est celle que je préconise : utiliser des logiciels libres tels que Shotwell et UFRaw pour (presque) tout faire !

Après avoir passé des heures à peaufiner leurs photos, nombreux sont ceux et celles qui veulent partager les meilleures à travers les réseaux sociaux. Shotwell s’intègre parfaitement à Facebook, à Flickr et à Picasa et permet d’exporter très simplement une sélection de ses photos vers ces sites. Il va sans dire que Shotwell permet aussi d’imprimer ses photos ainsi que de créer des diaporamas.

En quelques années, les logiciels libres sont devenus incontournables. Les Linux, Apache, PHP, MySQL, Firefox, VLC, Mplayer, Android et consorts sont utilisés par des millions de personnes chaque jour. Dans cet article, nous avons vu que les logiciels libres pour la manipulation de photos numériques n’ont pas grand chose à envier aux logiciels commerciaux. Au fait, j’ai oublié le plus important : ces logiciels libres sont tous gratuits !

[Je suis Avinash Meetoo et j'ai initialement écrit cet article pour le Numéro 4 du magazine 100% Mauricien, TechKnow. J'ai quelques autres articles sur la photographie sur mon blog personnel et des articles sur le logiciel libre sur mon blog professionel. Finalement, je suis sur LinkedIn, Twitter et Facebook.]

30Jun/091

Google: Let’s make the web faster

Posted by Dominique Derrier

20090630-google
Google lance une consultation sur les moyens d'accélérer l'internet basée sur 4 axes:

Broadband Access (Le petit problème de Maurice...)
Browser Technologies (Les petites astuces du renard en feu)
Internet Protocols (Revoir un peu les bons vieux HTTP/TCP/...)
Webmaster Tools (Concilier le beau et le rapide, Flash/...)
Other Ideas (Tout ce qui peut apporter une contribution).

N'hésitez pas à poster vos idées !
http://moderator.appspot.com/#16/e=79951